Talk. They Hear You.

Parents have a significant influence in their children’s decision to experiment with alcohol and other drugs. Although it may not seem like it, when parents talk about underage drinking and substance use, their children do hear them.

The Partnership supports the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s campaign, “Talk. They Hear You.” and their goal of helping parents and caregivers create an open dialogue with their children about the dangers of alcohol and other drugs.

SAMHSA Talk They Hear You logo

Most young people report that the reason they DON’T drink or use other drugs is because they don’t want to disappoint their parents. When you set clear expectations for healthy behavior, you send a message to your child that they matter and their health matters. It may not seem like they’re listening, but they are. Parents can find New Hampshire resources, learn how to talk with their child, and access helpful information to address early alcohol and drug use through The Partnership’s parenting support resources.

Explore more from the “Talk. They Hear You.” campaign and find additional tools and resources for parents on their website.

 

Become a MENTOR in New Hampshire or Find a Mentor for a Child You Care For

With the isolation and lack of connection that has resulted from COVID, we know that youth, young adults, and adults alike are longing for connection and authentic relationships. With limited gatherings and many young people missing school or participating remotely, it can be difficult for youth to know how to develop a productive and healthy rapport with adults without the organic interactions that would normally happen in hallways, grocery stores, field sidelines, bleachers, parks and arcades. Building connections and being intentional in your efforts to reach out to the young people in your life—or in your community—is essential. Mentoring is the perfect opportunity.

Local NH Mentor Programs 

There are many other opportunities to be a mentor and connect young people with mentors – this is can be found in informal relationships as well – through the arts, at work, through sports or trades. Caring adults play an important role in the life of the next generation.

Created with the goal of expanding opportunities for young people, MENTOR has built a field and movement program that allows young people to connect and grow through mentoring relationships.

Becoming a Better Mentor: Strategies to Be There for Young People, was written by experts to benefit and support any adult looking to be an advocate for young people. Full of real-world advice and evidence-based strategies, it provides mentors with tangible strategies to “be there” for young people in their various life journeys and teaches them about the core skills, key principles, and critical practices of mentoring.

Visit their website to learn more about mentoring and strategies to be an advocate for young people.

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